November 21, 2014

Medina
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9/11: A nation looks back … and moves forward

By Larry Neumeister and Samantha Gross

NEW YORK — Determined never to forget but perhaps ready to move on, the nation gently handed Sept. 11 over to history Sunday and etched its memory on a new generation. A stark memorial took its place where twin towers once stood, and the names of the lost resounded from children too young to remember terror from a decade ago.

In New York, Washington and Pennsylvania, across the United States and the world, people carried out rituals now as familiar as they are heartbreaking: American flags unfurled at the new World Trade Center tower and the Eiffel Tower, and tears shed at the base of the Pentagon and a base in Iraq.

Finn Straine, 12, left, and his brother Charlie Straine, 10, stand by the name of their father, James Straine Jr., as they attend the 10th anniversary ceremonies Sunday at the National September 11 Memorial in New York. (AP PHOTO)

Finn Straine, 12, left, and his brother Charlie Straine, 10, stand by the name of their father, James Straine Jr., as they attend the 10th anniversary ceremonies Sunday at the National September 11 Memorial in New York. (AP PHOTO)

President Barack Obama quoted the Bible and spoke of finding strength in fear. George W. Bush, still new to the presidency that day, invoked the national sacrifice of the Civil War. Vice President Joe Biden said hope must grow from tragedy.

And Jessica Rhodes talked about her niece, Kathryn L. LaBorie, the lead flight attendant on the plane that hit the south tower. She remembered a radiant smile and infinite compassion, and suggested that now, 10 years on, it is time to turn a corner.

“Although she may not ever be found, she will never ever be lost to her family and her friends,” Rhodes said after she read a segment of the list of the dead at ground zero. “Today we honor her by letting go of the sadness over losing her and embracing the joy of having known her.”

It was the 10th time the nation has paused to remember a defining day. In doing so, it closed a decade that produced two wars, deep changes in national security, shifts in everyday life — and, months before it ended, the death at American hands of the elusive terrorist who masterminded the attack.

“These past 10 years tell a story of resilience,” Obama said at a memorial concert at the Kennedy Center after he visited all three attack sites.

“It will be said of us that we kept that faith; that we took a painful blow, and emerged stronger,” he said.

The anniversary took place under heightened security. In New York and Washington especially, authorities were on alert. Ahead of the anniversary, the federal government warned those cities of a tip about a possible car-bomb plot. Police searched trucks in New York, and streets near the trade center were blocked. To walk within blocks of the site, people had to go through checkpoints.

The names of the fallen — 2,983 of them, including all the victims from the three Sept. 11 attack sites and six people who died when terrorists set off a truck bomb under the towers in 1993 — echoed across a place utterly transformed.

In the exact footprints of the two towers was a stately memorial, two great, weeping waterfalls, unveiled for the first time and, at least on the first day, open only to the relatives of the victims. Around the square perimeter of each were bronze parapets, etched with names.

Some of the relatives were dressed in funereal suits and others in fire department T-shirts. They traced the names with pencils and paper, and some left pictures or flowers, fitting the stems into the recessed lettering.

At the south tower pool, an acre in area and 30 feet deep, Mary Dwyer, of Brooklyn, remembered her sister, Lucy Fishman, who worked for Aon Corp., an insurance company that occupied seven floors near the very top.

“It’s the closest I’ll ever get to her again,” she said.

One Sept. 11 relative pronounced the memorial breathtaking. An underground section and a museum won’t open until next year, but for many of the families, the names were enough.

“It breaks me up,” said David Martinez, who watched the attacks happen from his office in Manhattan, and later learned that he had lost a cousin and a brother, one in each tower.

At memorial services, people talked of grief and loss and war and justice. But they also talked of moving forward.

“Every year it becomes more significant,” Barbara Gorman said at a service for the Port Authority dead, which included 37 police officers, one of them her husband, Thomas. “My kids are 25, 21, 18. They understand now. It’s not so much a tragedy anymore as history, the history of our country.”

In the decade between then and now, children have grown. The second-graders who were with Bush on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, will graduate high school next spring. And children who were in the cradle or the womb on that day are old enough to read names at the anniversary, old enough to bear the full burden of their grief.

“You will always be my hero,” Patricia Smith, 12, said of her mother.

Nicholas Gorki remembered his father, “who I never met because I was in my mother’s belly. I love you, Father. You gave me the gift of life, and I wish you could be here to enjoy it with me.”

Alex Zangrilli said: “Dad, I wish you were here with me to give me advice, to be on the sidelines when I play sports like all the other dads. … I wish we had more time together.”

Madeline Hoffman smiled as she said to her father: “Everyone always tells me I look and act just like you.” And Caitlin Roy, whose father was a firefighter, said: “I want to thank you for the nine years you spent as my dad. They were short but not without their benefits. We’re taken care of now. We’re happy.”