December 17, 2014

Medina
Cloudy
33°F
 

Nationwide impact of the flu

From wire reports

While flu normally doesn’t blanket the country until late January or February, it is already widespread in more than 40 states, with about 30 of them reporting some major hot spots. On Thursday, health officials blamed the flu for the deaths of 20 children so far, of which only two were fully vaccinated.

Also, the flu’s early arrival coincided with spikes in a variety of other viruses, including a childhood malady that mimics flu and a new norovirus that causes vomiting and diarrhea, or what is commonly known as “stomach flu.” So what people are calling the flu may, in fact, be something else.

Most people don’t undergo lab tests to confirm flu, and the symptoms are so similar that it can be hard to distinguish flu from other viruses, or even a cold.

Over the holidays, 250 people were sickened at a Mormon missionary training center in Utah, but the culprit turned out to be a norovirus, not the flu.

All the flu activity has led some to question whether this year’s flu shot is working. While health officials are still analyzing the vaccine, early indications are that it’s about 60 percent effective, which is in line with what’s been seen in other years.

The vaccine is reformulated each year, based on experts’ best guess of which strains of the virus will predominate. This year’s vaccine is well-matched to what’s going around. The government estimates that between a third and half of Americans have gotten the vaccine.