April 23, 2014

Medina
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Cloverleaf Schools: Deep cuts possible if levy fails

WESTFIELD TWP. — Cloverleaf Schools has been told there could be Draconian cuts if a May funding issue fails, and this week the superintendent outlined how Draconian they could be: a shortened school day; no art, music or gym for elementary students; closure of all school libraries; and the elimination of middle school sports.

Superintendent Daryl Kubilus presented a list of potential cuts to the school board Monday night.

“Make no mistake, this meeting tonight is not the desire of the Cloverleaf Board of Education,” Kubilus said. “This meeting is the result of state oversight. Every one of the potential cuts is bad for our students and bad for our community.”

The Ohio Department of Education declared the district in a state of fiscal emergency in January 2012, and a Fiscal Oversight Commission has been overseeing Cloverleaf’s finances since.

Kubilus said Cloverleaf has made more than $7 million in cuts over the past five years and spent $2 million less this school year than the last.

Fiscal Oversight Commission Chairman Paul Marshall has told Cloverleaf officials while the district can make it through this school year, it will run a deficit again in 2014-15. He said another $1 million will need to be eliminated and warned “draconian” cuts may be needed if a fourth levy fails in May.

On Monday, Kubilus presented $1.8 million in potential cuts to the board.

The first option includes a shorter school day; the elimination of art, music and physical education, which would cut seven teaching positions; and terminating transportation for kindergartners. The plan would save nearly $600,000, leaving another $400,000 to cut.

The other cuts would come from a combination of several options. Those include dropping middle school athletics; closing all libraries, which would cut a teaching position and six support staff positions; laying off another 12 support staffers; eliminating the gifted program coordinator; laying off more than six teachers; and doing away with extended-day kindergarten.

Kubilus said the reductions would wipe out many opportunities for students and take the district from its consistent excellent academic ranking to state minimum standards.

Kubilus said the district would face enrollment losses, lower student academic performance, employees leaving for other jobs, diminished property values and community pride, local economic damage, and unsupervised children due to a shortened school day.

“Excellence and minimums are independent concepts,” Kubilus said. “We will have one or we will have the other, but we will definitely not have both.”

The board will compose a list of cuts from those options totaling $1 million at its Feb. 24 meeting, and Kubilus will present the contingency plan to the Fiscal Oversight Commission for approval on Feb. 26.

To try to avoid making additional cuts, Cloverleaf has placed a 3.5-mill property tax and a 0.75 percent earned income tax for 10 years on the May ballot.

Kubilus said the income tax is expected to produce more than $3 million annually. The 3.5-mill property tax would take effect Jan. 1, 2015, and immediately produce more than $1.6 million annually for 10 years.

Voters rejected a 10-year, 8.3-mill levy in November and a 7.9-mill, 10-year levy last May. A 6.9-mill, 10-year levy was rejected in November 2011.

Contact reporter Dan Pompili at (330) 721-4012 or dpompili@medina-gazette.com.

  • Realistic

    To be VERY CLEAR, this will mean that wage earners in the Cloverleaf district will now have 1.25% taken from their paycheck. There is already .5% income tax coming out, and they want ANOTHER .75%!!!!!!! The 3.5 mill levy is ALSO on top of what you already pay!!! None of this is replacement… it is in ADDITION to what you pay now! That is a HUGE INCREASE FOR ALL!! This was the wrong way to go about this… Go for a 5-6 mill levy with my proposed, marketed cuts and you will pass a levy.
    Next – As far as cuts go, I applaud the district for looking at the extras and cutting them. Also, nice to see middle school sports on the cut list…. BUT, where is the HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS, AND ATHLETIC DIRECTOR in that discussion of cuts??????????? This last piece would complete the model that the voting, paying public wants. Cloverleaf admitted above that the cuts THEY proposed will drive students away. The cuts I propose will be BETTER, GUARANTEE A LEVY PASSAGE and will not drive away any other students than already estimated. In fact, it may encourage people to MOVE TO THE DISTRICT since the focus is BACK ON CORE EDUCATION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Regardless, this levy WILL NOT PASS – IT IS MORE EXPENSIVE THAN THE PREVIOUS LEVIES – check it out, do the math… you will see!!!!
    I am ashamed of Cloverleaf wasting money on failure levies… LISTEN to the people and do what they ask!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Joseph Doty

    Cutting MS sports is a money loser. You “save” approx. $46,000. Each kid that leaves takes approx. $5,800 in state funding with them. 8 or 9 students leave and you are losing money. More than 8 or 9 will leave. Dozens will leave if you cut MS sports.
    Cloverleaf doesn’t have any extras. The options the board has to consider are not “extras”!!
    How about posting under your real name and quit hiding behind a screen name.

  • js

    Thank you for posting this. The working man and woman is maxed out in this school district. Enough is enough!! ALSO -There should also be a Law against them trying to slide in a new Levy EVERY six months! That’s ridiculous and awfully shady. I vote NO against this Levy. Umm, plus I don’t even have children clogging up the system!!

  • Joseph Doty

    The state is requiring Cloverleaf to put a levy on the ballot until one is passed. They are not trying to “slide in a new levy every six months”. Just because you don’t have any students at Cloverleaf doesn’t mean you can ignore your responsibility as a member of this district to educate our youth.
    How about posting under your real name?

  • Realistic

    This levy effort is a waste of time and MONEY.
    I do support public education, but when the school system cannot awknowledge the CORRECT, PRIORITIZED cutbacks, the voting, paying public removes its support. This whole process over the last 10+ years shows that Cloverleaf wants to hold the voting, paying public hostage so that it can keep its unecessary extras. I don’t care what they cost or what they save… its the GENERAL PERCEPTION coming out of it and the voting, paying public sees wrong priorities and mismanagement.
    This whole Cloverleaf nightmare would stop if they do as I continually suggest. They are not courageous enough to think outside of the box. I have asked to meet with the board several times and they will not even consider anything different than what they are doing… so, it begs the question – How’s that workin’ for you????

  • Joseph Doty

    When you ask to meet with the board do you do it anonymously? Through a screen name? I have a hard time respecting anyone’s opinion if they are not willing to put their name on it.

  • Realistic

    Yes, I had several conversations with William Hutson about this (years ago) and he did agree with where I was coming from. He conceded that the board was not brave enough to take this action. Most recently, I was in discussions with John Gladden and he recognized the issues as well, but still no action by the board. They have refused to acknowledge that there is a sensible way out of this, and it may be painful for a short time. However, the benefit will be recognized long term with a supportive public and phenomenally educated student base.

  • slick330

    Mr Doty As for kids leaving cloverleaf, I live in the cloverleaf district and my kids are in the middle school at Buckeye, the have gone to Buckeye there entire time in school. I did not approve of closing the Lafayette and Chatham schools. When you were busing kids from the farthest point North in the District clear over to Seville, my kids would be on a bus for over an hour crazy, they go to Buckeye, I drive them it takes less than 5 minutes to transport them, As for the sports, Cloverleaf sports have been poor since the 80′s they play the big schools and are the whipping boys for these other schools like Akron playing Ohio State no chance in hell of winning. They lost community pride by not playing schools there size….This is the school boards fault past and present!

  • Harold Mogen

    First, I don’t care who is writing. I am interested in the ideas and comments.
    Second, it is a shame this district is even considering such cuts. A school without a library? That is sad.
    Third, considering they are being forced to make cuts, I do not understand the seeming immunity of administration. I remember 3 principals at the HS, and it was said that they needed all 3. Then one retired and they function okay with 2. They needed their own treasurer until she safely got another job, then they went to shared service.
    They appear to be very protective of the top layers.

  • Joseph Doty

    Cloverleaf has one more year in the Suburban League and then they are joining the PTC. The move is being made for the exact reason you state.

  • Joseph Doty

    Our buildings average 900 students per building and if you include all the staff, you have close to 1,000 people in each building everyday. The school I attended was a K-8 building with about 250 students. It was probably overstaffed with one principal. You cannot expect one principal to handle a building with over 900 students.
    How about no art, music or PE for kids K-6?? yet some one this page call these extras??

  • Harold Mogen

    My suggestion and yours are horrible options. There are no good cuts to make. To cut art, or music etc. will cause kids to leave. Can’t students be handled in a creative way with someone less expensive than a principal? My school had a dean of students and you did not want to go see him. When I worked, my supervisor managed 50 people. Are there more teachers than that in each building?
    It is terrible to cut anyone, but will parents and students flee if an administrator is cut or if art and music are cut?

  • Joseph Doty

    Principals do more than just discipline kids. Even if you cut every single administrator in the district, it still would not solve the problem. The sad truth is, the voters of Cloverleaf have run their schools on a shoe string budget for years. I am actually amazed that FE did not happen sooner.

    I was not suggesting we cut art, music and PE for K-6. That is one of the options the board has to consider. Some genius at the Ohio Dept. of Education decided that a “minimum” education does not include art, music and PE for K-6. And some people here call that an “extra”!

    As a taxpayer, I say we need to pass this levy now. It just keeps going up every time we lose a year of collection. The schools are not going away. This will be on the ballot every chance it gets until we pass.
    As I have been saying for years, pay now or pay more later but sooner or later you will pay.

  • Realistic

    Cloverleaf needs to use this opportunity to not join any league. GET RID OF ALL SPORTS AND THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR!! This is in instant, easy cut to make that saves funds AND shows the voters that the school means business.
    Levy supporters think about this with their kid goggles on. If you have a more holistic view of the entire state of affairs, you will see that the unnecessary stuff has to go. The voter won’t vote for ANY levy if they don’t see the unnecessary stuff gone.
    Trust me – Cloverleaf refuses to hold a meeting for the NO voters. Why will they not hear the voice of the public and work to agree?? After all, this is the TAXPAYER’S money… we want to see what we have spent wisely. Currently, it is not and they Cloverleaf district garners no respect. This is a joke of school system and will only earn respect when it comes to grips with its problems.

  • Harold Mogen

    I agree and hope voters realize soon that there is a pattern to failing levies. The next one just costs more. I am still confused by the decision to voluntarily ask the State to take over. It is true they probably would have come in anyway, but why ask for it? Didn’t hurrying the process just make the ordeal longer? Buckeye was on the ropes for a while and managed to recover without the state stepping in. It seems strange to have asked for this. More voter leverage might have been available to avoid the takeover if it had been the big, bad State pushing its way in, rather than being invited.

  • Harold Mogen

    It is very hard to agree with you, but on the other hand, I see your point. Cutting sports is huge and hard to recover from, but recovering from a state takeover is a long, difficult process also. Property values may not recover in my lifetime. The previous board made some decisions that were hard to understand, plus I heard many had friends and relatives in the system. I hope this current board is better.

  • Joseph Doty

    Buckeye made the decision that they would not go into FE. How was Buckeye going to do that? By making a lot of the cuts that Cloverleaf is looking at now. The Buckeye voters woke up and passed a levy. If that levy had not passed, you would have seen the same cuts made. In fact the Buckeye BOE had already passed a resolution that outlined automatic cuts that would be made if the levy failed. It was a calculated risk and thankfully for Buckeye, its voters stepped up to the plate and passed a long overdue levy.

    Here is a link to an explanation of fiscal emergency:

    https://ohioauditor.gov/fiscal/schools.html

  • Joseph Doty

    Also, thank you for posting under your real name. My respect sir.

  • Joseph Doty

    Cutting HS sports would be the dumbest thing the school could do. Student flight would be overwhelming.
    Anybody can attend a board meeting. The board has a public comment period before each meeting. However, they do require that you state your name which may be a problem for you. Can’t be anonymous at a public meeting!!!

  • Harold Mogen

    Thanks for the informative link

  • Common Sense

    As a recent alumnus of Cloverleaf, I can no longer sit back and stay quiet about the running of this school district. Cloverleaf is in a serious mess and has not sufficiently corrected the problems that need to be addressed. The first issue is the school’s budgeting problems. Beginning in 2008, this country experienced a major recession, the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Millions of people have lost their jobs through layoffs,had to take pay or benefit cuts, or had their hours cuts. So why have Cloverleaf employees, especially certified, had substantial salary increases from 2008 to the present. Some teachers now make over $6,000 more per year in salary than they did in 2008. This is during a time when my family, neighbors, and friends who live in the district have lost their jobs, taken substantial pay or benefit reductions, or had their hours cut. The salary figures of Cloverleaf employees are public record at The Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions and can be viewed online at http://www.buckeyeinstitute.org/teacher-salary. You just look up Cloverleaf Local School District under the “District Name” drop down bar to view them.

    The second issue is Cloverleaf certified employees’ contributions to their own healthcare costs. According to John Gladden, the Cloverleaf Local Schools Community Information Coordinator, Cloverleaf raised their healthcare percentage costs from 2.84% to 15% only when the school district began experiencing a fiscal emergency (http://mediatrackers.org/ohio/2012/05/09/local-school-district-defends-controversial-state-bailout). This means that the Cloverleaf certified staff was only paying 2.84% towards their healthcare before the district began experiencing a fiscal emergency. The school board, teachers, and superintendent have said that they have corrected this problem by now paying 15% towards their healthcare. However, according to a comprehensive study conduct by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation (directly related to Kaiser Permanente), the average American pays about 29% towards their healthcare premium under a family plan (http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2013/August/20/family-premiums-rise-4-percent-second-year-in-row.aspx). So Cloverleaf certified employees are paying half of the average American for their healthcare. I know my family, neighbors, and friends pay around 29%, if not more, and some of them work for healthcare institutions. If Cloverleaf certified employees would just pay the healthcare costs of an average American, it would save the district hundreds if not millions of dollars per year. By voting for this levy, you are essentially supporting and paying for Cloverleaf certified employees’ healthcare when many residents in the district struggle or cannot afford to pay for their own healthcare.

    The third issue is Cloverleaf’s lack of priority management. Lets be clear. Cloverleaf and all school districts’ sole goal is to educate students. Anything outside of that goal is non-essential. The first problem is cutting funding or completely eliminating programs that actually enhance the educational purpose of the district. The music and art programs enhance the educational purpose of the school. Numerous studies have shown that music and art improve the learning ability of students and help increase test scores. Furthermore, the Cloverleaf High School band program has been a phenomenal asset to the school by winning numerous competitions and representing the school in the state competition for decades. Secondly, cutting funding from the Principal’s Fund to Academic Challenge, an educational competition program, is absolutely ridiculous. Academic Challenge has been one of the few bright spots for the school, even during this difficult time. It has represented and won for the school on local television (WEWS Newschannel 5 Academic Challenge show) and state television (10-TV Brain Game show) numerous times, and in state and national competitions. Why would Cloverleaf cut funding to programs that have actually garnered positive attention for the school, been extremely
    successful, and are actually educationally-based? It isn’t like the sports at
    the school are doing anything. The baseball team has not had a winning season in who knows how long, the basketball team keeps losing to conference opponents by over 50 points a game, and the football team can only beat Buckeye. Yet this school district keeps pumping in money to consistently losing programs and builds new sporting facilities/fields. Even if the sporting facilities/fields were built through funding from the sports boosters, the taxpayers and the school district are still on the hook for maintaining them. If the school district were really serious about education, start asking people willing to contribute money outside of their taxes to the school to support its educational mission rather than the sports programs.

    The fourth issue is the treatment of teachers in the district that are actually doing their jobs and going above and beyond what they are required to do. The district has consistently rewarded teachers that do less and punished the ones that do more. In the high school, for example, most of the Honors or Advanced Placement (AP) teachers that go above and beyond to teach those courses make significantly less than the ones who teach basic classes or fail to do their jobs. Teachers that take on the added responsibility of upper level courses by going to additional trainings, writing class plans during the summer, and teach much more in a school year than the average teacher should be rewarded for that. On the other end of the spectrum, the district does nothing to get rid of teachers who do not conduct themselves with professionalism. When I was at the high school, the district did nothing to remove a teacher that had received multiple complaints every single year for over six years straight. Another teacher painted her nails, did her eyelashes, and took conversations on the phone during class, and just gave us worksheets so she would not have to teach. Finally, another teacher missed almost half of the school year with random excuses, and we learned absolutely nothing with different substitutes we would have every day in her absence. The leadership in the school district needs to actually hire and retain the best teachers possible, and remove the problem teachers.

    Finally, the leadership of Cloverleaf has just been completely incompetent and blatantly lies to the students and taxpayers. Cloverleaf is one of the only school districts in the state that receives property, income, and sales taxes, and still cannot manage to run the district effectively. First, the leadership screwed up the construction of the new Cloverleaf Elementary by building it too small when there was plenty of money left from the sales tax fund for permanent improvements. Consequently, sixth grade had to be added to an already cramped middle school, and there was talk for a few years to build an extension to the middle school. Since the school botched its original planning and it would cost much more to extend the middle school than to have built the new elementary school correctly, the students at the middle school now suffer the consequences. Secondly, when I was a student in 2009 after the income tax had passed several years earlier, the teachers, principals, and administrators in the high school promised students like me that we would receive new textbooks and technology from that money to enhance our learning experience. The textbooks we used in our political science class at the time were falling apart and had President Bill Clinton’s inauguration as the last event in it, which happened almost 20 years earlier. When the income tax passed, the students got no new textbooks or technology, but instead that money went into the teachers and administrators’ pockets. Finally, when I recently visited Cloverleaf High School, the names of former valedictorians and salutatorians listed in the display case on the cafeteria stage had not even been updated since the 2010 graduating class. I asked some teachers and administrators why my former classmates had not had their names updated on it since 2010, and they said there was no money to do that. It would cost the district maybe $75 to properly put all of those names in the display case, but yet certified employees continue to receive yearly raises in the thousands.

    With these problems, lack of priority management, and incompetence, there is no way I can ever support and vote for a Cloverleaf Schools levy again until the district gets its act together. I urge everyone that can vote within the Cloverleaf Local School District to stand up and vote “NO” for any future levy!

  • Parent

    How would a shorter school day save a significant amount of money?
    Aren’t teachers paid a salary for days? This should be explained further (just like all the other “possible cuts”). Also why isn’t anyone asking what happens when the union contracts are up in the near future…another levy perhaps?

  • Parent

    And by the way… very nice points and information “common sense” and “realistic”. More people are aware of these topics and agree with you then you realize. If some would ask more questions and take their blinders off we may get somewhere. We are talking about SCHOOL. EDUCATION should come first especially in a fiscal emergency. Everything else that keeps getting thrown around turns it into a joke… community and sports sound nice under normal circumstances but we are talking about an educational crisis. It makes me nervous that people that should be focused on this seem to have the priorities mixed up.

  • slick330

    parent; you bring up some very good points, even the union contracts that will be coming up

  • slick330

    very good points, I have went to the web sites that you posted and mr doty, one thing the past boards have wasted money no doubt. I know 2 people who worked for Chris Berry, one on the production floor and one in the office, the production worker got paid peanuts and got peanuts for a bonus at the year end, he would work from 6 till 2;30 and get paid for 7.75 hours, he did not pay for your break, the office person worked 8 till 4:30 and was paid for 8 hours and was given a huge bonus, yes it is his business and he can pay his employees any way he feels is right, but the bottom line is he took his spending habits from his company to schools and spent money like a drunken sailor. I am glad he is off the BOE and I will see how this new BOE does and I would consider supporting there new levy but they need to modify some of there request, as for a patrol officer in every building, Buckeye does fine with just one, and he rotates between buildings through out the day, yes it would be nice to have one in every building but lets spend the money on educating the kids. I live in Lafayette TWP and we contract police protection through the Sheriffs office, I might see an officer go down my road maybe once every 2 months if I am lucky. I just feel the taxpayers would be raked over by the Sheriffs office.

    I don’t like it when they feel sports is more important than educating our kids, as for cutting art, gym and music from k-6, yes I wish they could have both, I take these as threats to pass a levy, bulling that taxpayer

    As for my property value, I for one dont really care what my value is, I have to live some where and I have no plans of ever selling , as for a fact I just got an re-Appraisal and if went up 5000 and I did not do any improvements for over 10 years so I had to go and complain just to have them drop it back to the current value, and then I go down Westfield and I see that huge house and new barn built, somebody else must not be worried about lower property values.

  • Parent

    Im not saying it is easy BUT there needs to be more innovative thinking to make the best of this serious situation. Why is closing the library part of a “solution”? Yes it would save the salaries but we already have the books and resources. How many millions was just spent on building the library and the elementary school and we are that quick to possibly close the library and gym doors and chalk it up? “Well that didn’t work..on to the next idea?” What a waste and we are all literally paying for the decisions that have not worked this far along. The kids are the ones that will be suffering. I hope that the newer board members speak up and step out of the box and try to add some perspective and change. With all due respect to the positions and individuals, the elementary school alone has two gym teachers, two principals and other luxuries that should be sorted through before the kids have to miss out. It is about them right?

  • DannyP

    I looked up the website that you suggested..http://www.buckeyeinstitute.org/teacher-salary and to my surprise it did show some of the teachers salaries. What I thought was amazing is that many had received more than a 10,000 dollar increase sense 2008 with one going from 54,000 to over 72,000. Thanks for the web info site.. by the way..I have had 5 children in the Cloverleaf district. My youngest 2 are now in the high school. Also sense 2008, my salary decreased by 16,000 dollars..

  • DannyP

    Buckeye family’s were told that if they passed the levy, the HS busing would began again…nope it did not. Was this just a ploy to get votes? Ask a buckeye students parent what they think….just saying..by the way..when they stopped busing at cloverleaf, I told my children that when they put the levy back on the ballet again, someone within the school will talk about the inconveniences for parents getting their children to and from school plus the cost of doing so..and low and behold, someone did…my children laughed when we received that letter in the mail.

  • DannyP

    All I can say is…let the flight begin…

  • Colt2

    For the K-6 grades, the cuts will come from Music, Art & PE being dropped from their school day. For the MS & High School kids, the class periods will be shortened. They would need fewer teachers to fill the class periods. Current HS periods are 70 minutes and I think they would be cut to 50 minute periods.

  • Colt2

    The elementary school has K-5 for the entire district in one building. We now only have 2 principals when we used to have 4 serving that number of kids. There have already been so many, many cuts made over the last few years. I have a HS student and a MS student in the district. They have lost so many opportunities due to all of the cuts. These current cuts really are scraping the bottom of the barrel. We’ve been 20 years without any new property tax levies for operating monies. It is sad that we are now in this position.

  • Realistic

    It will happen either way… the only chance is to do what the district’s voters want and have asked for time and time again… CUT THE EXTRAS!!!!!!!!!!
    I would stake my life on the fact that once the extras are eliminated, and core education becomes the focus, a levy will pass. Cloverleaf refuses to do that though and they will continue to waste money putting levies up. They will also work to hurt the parents of students so that they feel forced to vote for yes for a levy… BULLYING AT ITS FINEST!!!!!!!!

  • Realistic

    You are 100% correct – your children have missed out on the core, quality education that the district is supposed to be providing. Instead, money was funneled to pay for sports and the athletic director. These are huge wastes that could have allowed your children to have a better, higher level of education.

  • Colt2

    You misunderstand me. I feel that my children are getting quality education. Colleges are looking for WELL ROUNDED kids. That includes the experiences that they receive from what you describe as extras. When we moved into this district, the school was a part of that decision. I would not have moved into a district that did not provide sports, music and art. Kids absolutely need something to be involved in. A minimum education will not give them that. Would you go to a dr. that only provides the minimum standards? Eat at a restaurant that only meets minimum standards?

  • Realistic

    A well rounded education is desired, BUT the district doesn’t even have the funds to maintain proper, core education. They strip from education before the extras… does that make sense?
    Colleges do look for kids to be involved in something other than high school. With that said, there are PLENTY of things in the community that children can be involved in… Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Church, Animal Shelters, Cadet program with a fire department, cadet program with a police department, soccer at NC soccer, basketball at the rec centers… the list goes on and on. These are the programs that colleges and employers look for. When is the last time you saw someone look at a resume for art, music, or sports? They are nice to haves, but not gotta haves. Emphasis is on what the child did outside, and went above and beyond for.

  • lookingallaroundme

    Did you notice principal martin’s salary went up 8000 in one year?
    Between 2010 and 2011 there was a big jump. Wasn’t that just before the state came in?

  • parent

    It is unbelievable I’m glad others are looking at this as well rather then blindly following. Why is a superintendent making over $100,000 during a fiscal emergency? Can’t even manage the budget but is sure bringing it home. I can empathize with you. We have also taken cuts at our household. Seems like most have so a good question is why are teachers and administration getting so much during these financially trying times. More people need to be aware of this!

  • Kathy Manbeck

    There is a new Levy every 6 months because we need this to pass and as long as it fails there will be one every 6 months! I am curious if you have children that attend school in this district, because I am sure if you did you would feel different. I have 2 children in the elementary and I will vote yes every time! When I was in school we had sports, music, library etc this is what makes a great well rounded student thus a great adult once school is completed. And I understand times are tough, my husband took a $10,000 pay cut 4 years ago, I get it trust me. But, if you try to sell your home in a district that has poor schools your home value decreases dramatically. Please look at the big picture, before I had kids I always voted yes, because I wanted my neighbor’s kids and all the kids in our community to have a great school they can be proud of! And the district has made lots of cuts already, there is no busing for High School students, no schools are open after school hours, Kindergarten is not full-time, classes in the elementary have over 32 students in them! I hope you change your mind and vote Yes in May!

  • TOILET MONKEY

    Not true. Your crossing the line woman.

  • DannyP

    Kathy….I like your husband, was forced to take a pay cut of 16,000, However, do you know that the average wage of every teacher in the Cloverleaf District went up 8 to 12,000 since 2008? Here is a link for you to find out for yourself. http://www.buckeyeinstitute.org/teacher-salary….This is a link for all public employees in Ohio..
    Until they get their own house in order I again will vote no.

  • Not so Realistic

    Almost all of the things you list as “extra community opportunities” come with a fee. Pay to join the rec., pay to join soccer at a private club, pay for uniforms and fees at a cadet program. Weren’t you the one talking about how hard times are and how no one in the district has any money for extras? Maybe only the extras you see as important? Like soccer at NC?

  • Bill

    I don’t think people are aware of what some of the teachers and administrators are making. I was not until I looked at the website provided (thank you) This information is shocking. Pay raises and extremely high salaries while the district is in ruins and we are about to take away our children’s extras? Don’t get me wrong there are some great teachers but for the most part this is not right.

  • Realistic

    Kathy – If I read your statement correctly, you are talking about how Cloverleaf made cuts to all things related to core education. Why would they priortize these cuts over items such as cutting the athletic director, cutting sports program funding (turn in to purely booster funded if there is desire to keep it), etc,.?? Now, do you see the point of how Cloverleaf is currently not focused on education?
    I would not vote for a levy until the district realizes that it needs to start over. Start from core education, identify its cost, and see how the current incoming funding fits that. In these hard financial times, the district needs to understand that it has a set amount of $$ to work with. Make that money count… for CORE education items. Once the voters see this and understand that the district has the best intentions for the financial spend, the voters would be willing to approve future funding requests.
    It is that simple. Cloverleaf refuses to look at it this way and they will fail until they do see it this way.

  • Parent

    Realistic – I completely agree with you. Wish you were on the board to express this needed point. Our household is all about a levy passing if we knew the financial priorities were in order and saw that education was really number one. Many people do not have faith in the decisions that are being made and how money is being designated. We need to start fresh with EDUCATION coming first and expand from there. Cloverleaf needs to financially revamp and not just ask for more money. Im not sure how that works with current contracts in place but future contracts need to be included in this change.

  • Realistic

    You are 100% correct – I am in the same boat as you are.

  • Realistic

    Not necessarily… the cadets we have at the fire department do not pay a dime. The cadets at the police department also do not pay anything.

  • guest

    Cloverleaf can do many things to raise money for their school system. Ask Local business’s like Westfield Insurance, Panther, DQ, East of Chicago, Mayfield Express, TA truck stops, to support sports teams so the students don’t have to pay to play. Westfield Township has stop many things from being built where the old 76 truck stop was that would have help the school system with tax money.

  • Cloverleaf parent

    The fire depts. are volunteer and funded by the towns. The sports are not.

  • guest

    Why DO some of the teachers and administrators make so much money and who is the one to approve these salaries when contracts are passed? Im honestly asking this question and looking for an answer. I can’t wrap my head around why people are making so much money and the district can’t even afford a normal school schedule or to keep its school libraries open. Does anyone have some real insight on this?