September 2, 2014

Medina
Intermittent clouds
71°F

Flooding ripped through homes

Homes can be repaired, but the emotional damage done by Monday’s storm can linger.

Christine Barbarotta, of Medina Township, said she was at her computer in her home on Granger Road, while her husband, Anthony, and five children were asleep upstairs just past midnight on Monday when she felt the need to check on the rest of her house to see if it had flooded.

“I ran upstairs and yelled, ‘Get up! Everyone, get up!’ “ she said. “It came in so fast through the back porch, up through the drains and through the front door.”

At its height, the water was more than 4 feet deep inside their home.

Brick Premo, Tim Sinclair’s brother-in-law, throws pieces of floor molding into a dumpster on Thursday. Sinclair’s Medina Township home has to be gutted and remodeled because of damage caused by flash flooding on Monday. (ANDREW DAVIS / GAZETTE)

Brick Premo, Tim Sinclair’s brother-in-law, throws pieces of floor molding into a dumpster on Thursday. Sinclair’s Medina Township home has to be gutted and remodeled because of damage caused by flash flooding on Monday. (ANDREW DAVIS / GAZETTE)

“We were so panicked,” she said. “If we would have stayed in the house five minutes longer, we would have had to get rescued.”

The Barbarottas have lived in their home on Granger for 10 years. Their house has flooded before, but nothing to the magnitude of Monday night’s flash flood.

Christine Barbarotta said the water in the first flood was only about 1ᄑ feet deep, but it prompted them to get insurance in case it ever happened again.

“Piles of clothes, books, all my kids’ toys — I mean — anything you can think of,” she said. “It’s all gone.”

Mud and silt covers everything from the washer and dryer to the countertops, while their furniture and appliances, along with a 150-pound China cabinet were ripped out of their places by the floodwaters and strewn across the house.

“This is a nightmare,” Barbarotta said as she looked across her living room at the destruction.

The floodwaters also whisked away sentimental objects.

A wooden picture book on the coffee table in memory her husband’s sister who had passed away is gone.

“We were able to recover almost everything that got washed out of the house, but something sentimental like that has got to disappear?” she said.

The Barbarottas were lucky because they have insurance, but others on the same street were not as fortunate.

Tim Sinclair woke up just before 2 a.m. Tuesday and felt the carpet beneath his feet was damp. Minutes later, the water had risen to almost 2 feet.

He and his wife, Patricia, do not have flood insurance for their home of 22 years.

“I was in shock. I forgot about everything I had set aside for an emergency and we just got out the door,” he said.

Tim Sinclair said he will use his savings to pay for most of the repairs.

The Sinclairs’ home needs to be gutted and the dumpster in their driveway is almost full.

All of their furniture and most of their belongings are lost.

Medina County Auditor Mike Kovack reminded homeowners that storm damage to houses and other real property can result in a reduction in property taxes.

To get the credit, homeowners must fill out a Destroyed or Damaged form, available at the auditor’s website, www.medinacountyauditor.org/forms.htm, or at the office, 144 N. Broadway St., Medina.

Contact reporter Andrew Davis at (330) 721-4050 or adavis@medina-gazette.com.