January 31, 2015

Medina
Partly cloudy
8°F
 

Two emaciated dogs rescued from Guilford Township home

This 7-year-old pitbull was one of two dogs rescued from a Greenwich Road home in Guilford Township last week. The owners of the dogs, Burdett and Augusta Crandall, have been charged in Wadsworth Municipal Court with cruelty against animals, a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in the Medina County Jail. (PHOTO PROVIDED)

This 7-year-old pitbull was one of two dogs rescued from a Greenwich Road home in Guilford Township last week. The owners of the dogs, Burdett and Augusta Crandall, have been charged in Wadsworth Municipal Court with cruelty against animals, a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in the Medina County Jail. (PHOTO PROVIDED)

Two emaciated dogs may take months to recover after they were rescued by a humane officer last week from a couple’s Greenwich Road home in Guilford Township.

The couple, Burdett and Augusta Crandall, has been charged in Wadsworth Municipal Court with cruelty against animals, a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in the Medina County Jail.

Humane officer Mary Jo Johnson, of the Medina County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, said she discovered the dogs Aug. 26 after receiving an anonymous call.

This 3-year-old boxer was one of two dogs rescued from a Greenwich Road home in Guilford Township last week. (PHOTO PROVIDED)

This 3-year-old boxer was one of two dogs rescued from a Greenwich Road home in Guilford Township last week. (PHOTO PROVIDED)

Johnson said the two dogs, a 7-year-old pitbull and a 3-year-old boxer, were in very poor condition.

“They were very thin,” she said. “The pitbull was literally skin and bones.”

Both dogs weighed half or less what they should weigh if they were healthy, she said. The bones on both animals are visible and defined under their skin.

Johnson said the pitbull, which remains in an animal hospital, was only able to take a few steps before collapsing when she arrived at the home.

The boxer is in slightly better condition, she said, with much more energy.

She said the couple told her they couldn’t afford to feed the animals, which have been suffering from reduced weight for about three months.

“They just didn’t have the money to take care of them,” she said. “But I tell people all the time that having an animal is an elective. If you choose to get one and then you can’t care for them, maybe you shouldn’t have them or you should give them up.”

Johnson said the couple told her they fed the dogs the day before she arrived, but she said it’s unlikely they were fed regularly.

“For a dog to get that incredibly thin and weak, it’s a good 10 days before they get to that point,” she said. “You shouldn’t be able to see every single bone.”

She said the boxer has been released to a foster home for 24-hour care, and a foster home has been set up for the pitbull upon its release from the animal hospital.

The hospital bills will come out about $300 a day, Johnson said, and the SPCA is accepting donations to help pay for the dog’s treatment. To donate, call the SPCA at (330) 723-7722.

If other families are facing financial crises in which they can’t feed their animals, Johnson said the SPCA donates pet food to local pantries and food banks and tries to provide food free-of-charge to those who stop into their Medina location on South Medina Street.

Cruelty against animals is a misdemeanor in Ohio. Several bills have been introduced to the Ohio Legislature to make it a felony, but none have passed.

Contact reporter Nick Glunt at (330) 721-4048 or nglunt@medina-gazette.com. Follow him on Twitter @ngfalcon.