The Medina County Gazette http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com The Medina County Gazette is a community newspaper serving Medina County, Ohio, since 1832. Sat, 28 Feb 2015 10:33:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.4 David N. Reed http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/david-n-reed/ http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/david-n-reed/#respond Sat, 28 Feb 2015 10:33:46 +0000 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/?p=160082 David N. Reed passed away Wednesday, February 25, 2015, at home and surrounded by family and friends. He never let it get him down and he kept fighting. Cancer may have taken his body, but it did not take his soul! He was born August 6, 1958 to John “Jack” and Mary “Arlene” (Hines) Reed, Read More...

The post David N. Reed appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.


]]>
Reed_DavidDavid N. Reed passed away Wednesday, February 25, 2015, at home and surrounded by family and friends. He never let it get him down and he kept fighting. Cancer may have taken his body, but it did not take his soul! He was born August 6, 1958 to John “Jack” and Mary “Arlene” (Hines) Reed, in West Salem.

He graduated from Northwestern High School in 1976, continued his education at Akron University and Northwestern University to get his Master’s and become a certified Orthotist and Prosthetist. David worked at Yanke Bionics for more than 35 years.

He is survived by his children: daughters, Heather Reed and Ashley Reed; son, Paul Reed; his siblings, Jim (wife Nikki) Reed, Marilyn (nee Reed) (husband Bob) Houston, Margaret (nee Reed) (husband Ken) Santelmann and Phil (wife Diane) Reed; and many nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Jack and Arlene Reed.

John Steinbeck stated “how will we know it is us without our past?” Knowing and embracing his family history was important to David, as was cultivating a passion and appreciation for heritage in his children. He learned to love history in the most American Way, through travels with his immigrant father. David also aspired to learn the skills and craftsmanship of his clock maker grandfather. This desire sparked a hobby that led to the collection and restoration of almost 100 clocks, including some bearing his grandfather’s name. These influences molded David into a hard working, supportive and loving father. Many knew David for his hands: whether he was sculpting prosthetics, building furniture or repairing antique clocks. But it was his heart that infused life, personality, and love into his work and hobbies. David included his children in his hobbies, raising them in a home surrounded by family heirlooms, photographs and stories. He nurtured a passion and reverence for understanding the past by taking his children on journeys across the country, experiencing America first hand through history, culture and nature. David took a unique, personal connection to the past with each child: through Civil War battlefield crawls with Heather, through bargain shopping for antiques at auctions with Ashley and through antique tractor restoration with Paul. David incorporated a connection to family into every aspect of his life and made sure that his children and his descendants, know who they are and where they came from.

Funeral Service will be Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 11 A.M., at the Matteson Funeral Home in West Salem with Reverend Doug Lewis and Reverend Dave Maly officiating. Friends will be received at the funeral home Tuesday, March 3, 2015 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8. Burial will be in Hazzard Cemetery.

Online condolences may be shared at the funeral home website at www.mattesonfh.com


The post David N. Reed appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.

]]>
http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/david-n-reed/feed/ 0
Bucks peak at right time http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/bucks-peak-right-time/ http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/bucks-peak-right-time/#respond Sat, 28 Feb 2015 09:00:23 +0000 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/?p=160089     YORK TWP. — Every boys basketball team aims to peak for the start of the postseason. Buckeye is one of the few to actually achieve that goal. Junior forward Liam Murray scored 17 points, including a 3-pointer late in the fourth quarter, as the Bucks edged Columbia 57-52 in Patriot Athletic Conference cross-division Read More...

The post Bucks peak at right time appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.


]]>
Buckeye senior guard Tyler Hagmeier beats Columbias Kevin Simon to a reboound during the second quarter. Photo by Aaron Josefczyk

Buckeye senior guard Tyler Hagmeier beats Columbias Kevin Simon to a reboound during the second quarter. Photo by Aaron Josefczyk

 

 

YORK TWP. — Every boys basketball team aims to peak for the start of the postseason. Buckeye is one of the few to actually achieve that goal.

Junior forward Liam Murray scored 17 points, including a 3-pointer late in the fourth quarter, as the Bucks edged Columbia 57-52 in Patriot Athletic Conference cross-division action Friday.

Buckeye (14-8, 13-3) won for the 10th time in its last 11 games and will head into the tournament on a high after pulling off the home triumph.

“We’re on such a good streak right now and the crowd tonight was insane,” said Murray, who also grabbed five rebounds. “I’m not sure we could have asked for a better way to end the regular season.”

Junior shooting guard Nate Polidori had a team-high 20 points for the Bucks, while senior point guard Ryan Grauel collected 10 points, a game-best 10 rebounds and four assists.

Junior power forward David Delahunty led all players with 26 points for the Raiders (14-8, 12-4). He also joined the 1,000-point club early in the fourth, but couldn’t rally his squad past the determined hosts.

“It took a little time for our kids to get comfortable early in the season, which is to be expected considering how few of them had much varsity experience,” Buckeye coach Matt Saunders said. “But at this point, they’re just clicking, and it’s a lot of fun watching them have fun out on the court together.”

Columbia seized a 16-6 lead in the first, but Grauel fed Murray for back-to-back hoops to end the period.

The Raiders’ inability to extend their early advantage proved costly when the Bucks used a 23-7 run spanning the third and fourth to go in front for good on a Murray trey.

Buckeye eventually jumped in front by 10 at 42-32 on a cost-to-coast drive by Polidori before Delahunty caught fire. The leading scorer in the PAC fired in eight points in a two-minute span, pulling Columbia to 44-43 midway through the fourth.

Polidori, however, quelled the comeback with two straight steals for scores. Murray then delivered the dagger with 2:57 left by drilling a trey off an offensive rebound by senior small forward Tyler Hagmeier.

“That was a huge sequence, but I really thought the turning point was when we could have gone up 12 late in the first, but only wound up with a six-point lead,” Raiders coach Larry Babics said. “We just made too many costly mistakes to win this game.”

Small forward Kevin Simon scored 16 points for Columbia, which finished second in the PAC Stripes Division. The Raiders made 18-of-20 free throws.

Polidori also had eight rebounds, while Hagmeier dished out three assists with four boards. Despite being vastly undersized, the PAC Stars Division runner-up Bucks won the rebounding battle 32-31 as Grauel gobbled up the glass from start to finish.

“Ryan is a fantastic player who is our leader on and off the court,” Murray said. “He does amazing things with the ball and he rebounds really well for his position.

“Honestly, everybody did what they had to do for us tonight. It was a really good game all around.”

Notes

Justin Canedy scored a game-high 21 points as Buckeye’s junior varsity beat Columbia 59-50. Braeden Stauffer and Joey Bartinelli added 14 points apiece for the Bucks, who finished 19-3.

l Saunders will coach the home team in the annual Medina County Senior All-Star Game, which takes place at Buckeye on March 24.

Contact Brian Dulik at brisports@hotmail.com.

Buckeye 57, Columbia 52

COLUMBIA         16  6  10  20  —  52

BUCKEYE            10  9  21  17  —  57

Columbia — Kevin Simon 6-2-16, David Delahunty 8-10-26, Brandon Heidecker 1-0-2, Justin Tacchite 1-4-6, Brian Hershey 0-2-2, Taylor Beck 0-0-0, John Fetchet 0-0-0, Jordan DeLisle 0-0-0. TOTALS: 16-18-52.

Buckeye — Liam Murray 6-2-17, Tyler Hagmeier 0-0-0, Nick Wills 2-0-4, Nate Polidori 7-6-20, Ryan Grauel 2-6-10, Justin Lowry 0-0-0, Hayden Roskey 1-0-2, Blake Brumfield 2-0-4. TOTALS: 20-14-57.

3-point goals — Simon 2, Murray 3. Rebounds — Columbia 31 (Delahunty 9), Buckeye 32 (Grauel 10). Assists — Columbia 9 (Hershey 3), Buckeye 11 (Grauel 4). Records — Columbia (14-8, 12-4), Buckeye (14-8, 13-3). Junior varsity — Buckeye 59, Columbia 50.


The post Bucks peak at right time appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.

]]>
http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/bucks-peak-right-time/feed/ 0
Quiring stands tall in win http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/quiring-stands-tall-win/ http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/quiring-stands-tall-win/#respond Sat, 28 Feb 2015 09:00:11 +0000 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/?p=160086     BRUNSWICK — All 5 feet, 8 inches of Michael Quiring — and that’s being generous — attacked the redwoods with an unflappable resolve. The diminutive point guard kept swinging until the trees crashed to the ground. In a Northeast Ohio Conference Valley Division slugfest featuring nine players standing 6-4 or taller, the smallest Read More...

The post Quiring stands tall in win appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.


]]>
Brunswick's Steve Ficyk chases down a loose ball in front of Shaker Height's Ricky Stokes in the second quarter. Photo by Judd Smerglia

Brunswick’s Steve Ficyk chases down a loose ball in front of Shaker Height’s Ricky Stokes in the second quarter. Photo by Judd Smerglia

 

 

BRUNSWICK — All 5 feet, 8 inches of Michael Quiring — and that’s being generous — attacked the redwoods with an unflappable resolve. The diminutive point guard kept swinging until the trees crashed to the ground.

In a Northeast Ohio Conference Valley Division slugfest featuring nine players standing 6-4 or taller, the smallest player on the court was the man, the myth and the legend in the fourth quarter Friday as Brunswick’s boys basketball team rallied to upset Shaker Heights
47-41.

The Blue Devils (17-5, 6-4) forced the Red Raiders (15-6, 8-2) to share the division championship with Garfield Heights (19-3, 8-2), but had to rally from a 14-2 deficit to do it.

“Oh, man, we came out slow, but the coaches kept instilling that if we keep fighting and keep chopping at the tree, eventually  it will fall,” Quiring said.

Quiring was everywhere as Brunswick won the second half 29-17 and scored 10 of the final 14 points. With only an assist, steal and turnover at halftime, the junior posted 10 points, four dimes, two steals and an offensive rebound over the final 16 minutes. He also took a charge against 6-8 West Virginia pledge Esa Ahmad (27 points, 10 rebounds), one of the top college recruits in the Midwest.

No one was more clutch in the fourth quarter than Quiring. The first-year starter gave Brunswick its initial lead on a reverse layup with 3:21 left in the third, had a 3-pointer that kept the score close, made two free throws that gave the Blue Devils a 42-38 lead with 1:35 left and split a pair of defenders before kicking to the backside corner, where a wide-open Jason Okulovich swished the dagger 3-pointer with 55 seconds to go.

The Red Raiders couldn’t stop “Q” from carving them up no matter how many trees they threw his way.

“He keeps getting better and better every game,” Brunswick coach Joe Mackey said. “He’s that important to our team. When he’s on the floor, we’re so much better. He does a nice job and is a great catalyst. He gets everyone involved, and he was knocking down shots for us as well.

“He’s a competitor. People don’t know that about Mike. He likes to compete and he likes to win.”

Power forward Eric Bulic added 12 points and five rebounds and was the only Blue Devil to make a shot inside the 3-point arc for the first 2ᄑ quarters, while Hillsdale (Mich.) quarterback recruit Steven Ficyk hit Brunswick’s first field goal at the 1:59 mark of the first quarter and drilled another trifecta that kick-started the comeback.

Center Nate Armagost battled foul trouble to post six second-half points and five boards, and the matchup 2-3 defense that double-teamed Ahmad in the second half allowed Brunswick to methodically chop the deficit.

It was a signature win for a businesslike, overachieving program that broke out of its emotional shell and embraced the magnitude of the moment.

“Shaker’s a really good team, but we’re a really good program that does things the right way,” Mackey said. “I feel bad our kids don’t have hardware. I feel like we deserve something. Hopefully we go on a tournament run here.”

Shaker Heights took its final lead, 38-37, on an inside score by Ahmad, but Bulic answered with a hotly contested 3-pointer. Brunswick then got a stop and Bulic grabbed a huge rebound after Armagost missed a free throw with 2:30 left.

Quiring and Co. then masterfully handled in-your-face man defense to burn 55 seconds of clock, leading to Quiring making both ends of a one-and-one to make it 42-38. Ahmad quickly buried a 3-pointer to keep the Red Raiders afloat, but 22 seconds later Quiring wiggled into the open and found Okulovich for a rare open 3-pointer that drew a roar from the near-capacity crowd.

Shaker Heights’ Ricky Stokes (10 points), who combined with Ahmad to score all but four of his team’s points, then lost the ball out of bounds, setting up the Blue Devils’ Zach Cebula beating the press and finding Ficyk for a no-one-in-sight layup in the closing moments.

The student section then gleefully stormed the court, but waited respectfully until the postgame handshakes were completed.

“We’ve been in that spot a lot of times and, to be honest, we’ve lost a lot of those games that have come down to the clutch,” said Quiring, whose team has lost five games by an average of 3.4 points. “We knew we needed to start capitalizing and not blowing those leads, especially so close to the tournament.”

Notes

Brunswick began the game 1-for-7 from 3-point range but made eight of its final 14 attempts. Among them was a top-of-the-arc bomb from ninth-man Patrick Magalski that made the score 18-12 Shaker Heights in the second quarter.

l Ahmad and Stokes combined for 37 points on 14-of-23 shooting. The eight other Red Raiders who saw action had four points on 2-of-14 shooting, including a 0-for-5 effort from 13.1-point scorer David Wright.

l Ryan Flynn had 14 points as Brunswick’s junior varsity won 51-48.

Contact Albert Grindle at (330) 721-4043 or agrindle@medina-gazette.com.

Brunswick 47, Shaker Heights 41

SHAKER HEIGHTS           16  8    7   10  —  41

BRUNSWICK      5  13  14  15  —  47

Shaker Heights — David Wright 0-0-0, Justin Johnson 1-0-2, Esa Ahmad 10-5-27, Kaleb Roy 0-0-0, Amani Redus 0-0-0, Ricky Stokes 4-1-10, Braun Hatfield 0-0-0, Jordan Burge 0-0-0, Jeramie Burge 0-0-0, Courtney Mays 0-0-0. TOTALS: 16-6-41.

Brunswick — Zach Cebula 0-0-0, Eric Bulic 4-2-12, Nate Armagost 2-2-6, Jason Okulovich 2-0-6, Michael Quiring 3-2-10, Steven Ficyk 2-0-6, Kevin Simmons 0-0-0, Aaron Badowski 0-2-2, Patrick Magalski 1-0-3. TOTALS: 15-8-47.

3-point goals — Ahmad 2, Stokes, Bulic 2, Okulovich 2, Quiring 2, Ficyk 2, Magalski. Rebounds — Shaker Heights 19 (Ahmad 10), Brunswick 17 (Armagost, Bulic 5). Assists — Shaker Heights 6 (Ahmad, Roy 2), Brunswick 10 (Quiring 5). Records — Shaker Heights (15-6, 8-2), Brunswick (17-5, 6-4). Junior varsity — Brunswick 51, Shaker Heights 48.


The post Quiring stands tall in win appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.

]]>
http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/quiring-stands-tall-win/feed/ 0
Cardinals win battle of giants http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/cardinals-win-battle-giants/ http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/cardinals-win-battle-giants/#respond Sat, 28 Feb 2015 09:00:00 +0000 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/?p=160097   MEDINA — Micah Potter and Jon Teske will have a lot to talk about the next time their families get together. Both junior centers had monster nights Friday, but Potter’s Mentor team got the better of Teske and Medina with an 81-69 victory in Northeast Ohio Conference Valley Division boys basketball action. “It’s two Read More...

The post Cardinals win battle of giants appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.


]]>
Medina's Zach Bennett drives around Mentor's Paul Sateika during the second quarter. (RON SCHWANE / GAZETTE)

Medina’s Zach Bennett drives around Mentor’s Paul Sateika during the second quarter. (RON SCHWANE / GAZETTE)

 

MEDINA — Micah Potter and Jon Teske will have a lot to talk about the next time their families get together.

Both junior centers had monster nights Friday, but Potter’s Mentor team got the better of Teske and Medina with an 81-69 victory in Northeast Ohio Conference Valley Division boys basketball action.

“It’s two big-time athletes going against each other,” said the 6-foot-9ᄑ Potter, who had 32 points, 16 rebounds, an assist, steal and two blocks. “He’s a great player and he played his butt off tonight. It’s always fun playing against Jon.”

Potter, who is being recruited by North Carolina State, West Virginia, Davidson and a number of Mid-American Conference schools, hit five 3-pointers while playing against the 7-foot Teske, who has a full ride from Michigan.

The two have known each other since childhood, as their grandparents went to college together and their fathers grew up playing basketball against one another. They also played AAU together for Columbus-based Team Work the previous two seasons, though Potter will switch teams this spring.

“He’s one of the top players in the state,” said Teske, who finished with 21 points on 9-for-12 shooting, nine rebounds, a steal and four blocks. “It’s always fun playing against the top players around.”

Teske didn’t start because it was senior night but wasted no time making an impact, scoring 16 points in his first nine minutes on the floor as Medina (11-11, 3-7) trailed 31-27 with 4:40 to go in the first half. Included were two dunks, one a resounding follow-up slam of a Zach Bennett miss.

Potter was just as good in the first half, when he had a dunk of his own en route to 16 points, and even better in the third period, when he hit three 3-pointers and scored 14 points as the Cardinals (12-9, 5-5) went up by as many as 25.

The difference was Potter got more help from his sharp-shooting teammates, as Mentor made all 12 of its 3-pointers over the first three periods to take a 69-51 lead into the fourth. The Cardinals made eight trifectas and closed on a 10-0 run to take a 46-32 halftime lead, with Medina’s only lead coming at 17-16 with 53 seconds left in the first period.

Starting no seniors and without captain Joey Zaugg (concussion), the Cardinals got three 3-pointers, 16 points, three rebounds and seven assists from junior point guard Andrew Valeri, four 3-pointers for 12 points from freshman small forward Caden Kryz and six points and five assists from junior shooting guard Kyle McIntosh.

“It’s tough to win when a team makes that many threes against you,” Medina coach Chris Hassinger said. “(Potter) was really fresh tonight because he was able to take a few breaks (at the defensive end).”

Potter, who made several shots from well behind the 3-point line, was particularly effective when Valeri or McIntosh used a high pick, which forced Teske to either show above the arc or help at the hoop.

“One of our biggest deficiencies is defending ball screens,” Hassinger said. “If (Teske) has to come out and show a lot, it really hurts us defensively.”

The Bees, who open Copley Division I Sectional play Wednesday at home against North Canton Hoover, got 14 points, three rebounds and three assists from power forward Evan Schreck, eight points, nine boards, four assists and three steals from shooting guard Bennett, who actually opened the game at center, eight points from point guard Ben Geschke and seven points and five rebounds from small forward Tyler King, but once they got down big, Teske disappeared from the offense.

Teske had just one field goal and three free throws in the second half, when he rarely touched the ball in the low post, while Potter, who had 30 points through three periods, had just two points in a foul-plagued fourth period.

“What happens is you get down double digits and players start panicking and taking quick shots,” Hassinger said. “That’s probably when you should go inside.”

The Bees were down 15 after a Geschke 3-pointer with 22 seconds left in the third period, but a Potter three-point play off an offensive rebound with 4.1 ticks on the clock put Mentor back up 18 heading into the fourth.

Another Geschke three, this one with 2:01 to go in the game, made it 78-69, but the Bees didn’t score again.

“We played our butts off today,” Potter said. “It’s definitely a good time to get a win with the playoffs coming up.”

Notes

Several of the Bees’ six 12th-graders offered to be the one who didn’t start the game, but in a class act Illinois football recruit Zeke Martin settled the matter by saying he should be the non-starter because he wasn’t involved in the program from the eighth grade through his junior year.

 

 

 

 


The post Cardinals win battle of giants appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.

]]>
http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/cardinals-win-battle-giants/feed/ 0
Houska nets 1,000th point in win http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/houska-nets-1000th-point-win/ http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/houska-nets-1000th-point-win/#respond Sat, 28 Feb 2015 08:45:36 +0000 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/?p=160095 MACEDONIA — It took Tanner Houska almost the entire game to get his points across Friday. Highland, on the other hand, didn’t wait that long. Add it up and the Hornets boys basketball team closed the regular season with a 57-50 Suburban League win over Nordonia. Houska (10 points) scored his 1,000th career point with Read More...

The post Houska nets 1,000th point in win appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.


]]>
MACEDONIA — It took Tanner Houska almost the entire game to get his points across Friday.

Highland, on the other hand, didn’t wait that long.

Add it up and the Hornets boys basketball team closed the regular season with a 57-50 Suburban League win over Nordonia.

Houska (10 points) scored his 1,000th career point with 27.8 seconds left as Highland (16-6, 9-5) notched its most wins since 2005 (18-4).

Houska heads into the postseason with 1,002 points and joins teammate Brogan Scott (1,403) as a 1,000-point scorer. The two are believed to be the first teammates in Medina County history to have 1,000 points at the same time.

Houska became the 29th documented county player to hit that mark.

“Every coach hopes for and asks for kids who can consistently score the ball,” Highland coach Michael Murphy said. “The other thing is longevity. A lot of times there are injuries, kids are hurt or whatever it might be.

“These kids, for the most part, I can’t remember them missing games. Not only are they scoring, but they’re staying healthy. It’s awesome.”

Houska took his time getting to 1,000, but it finally came after Alex Alders (18 points) was hit with a technical. Houska split a pair of free throws to give Highland a 55-48 lead with less than 30 seconds left.

“It means a lot to me,” Houska said. “It’s a good individual accomplishment. I’m having fun with the team, but we definitely have our team goals in mind.”

One of those is to better the mark of the 2005 squad and match the record of 19 wins shared by the John Hatch-led 1952-53 and 1953-54 teams. Victory No. 17 could come Wednesday, when the 12th-ranked Hornets play No. 22 Canton McKinley in a Copley Division I Sectional opener.

“I think it’s awesome,” Murphy said. “We just talked about a 16-win season. For those kids, scoring over 1,000 points, it’s the first time they’ve tasted that as well.

“You never want to look forward to the next thing. It’s celebrate the 16 wins later. But eventually they’ll be like, ‘Oh, yeah, do you remember that team that had 16 wins?’ Right now, the first thing we do is start talking about Wednesday. But this is a huge accomplishment. It’s obviously a tribute to the type of kids I have on this team.”

Against the Knights (7-14, 5-9), Highland needed everything in its arsenal. Nordonia hung around for three-plus quarters, taking the lead on five occasions and heading into the fourth quarter up two.

While Kevin Greenhoe (8 points, 10 rebounds), Scott (25 points) and Houska (team-high 6 assists) were doing their best to keep Highland ahead, the Knights didn’t go away.

That’s when Greenhoe and Scott, specifically, took over. Nordonia had a 43-37 lead with 7:04 remaining, but the Hornets scored the next 12 points.

“The comeback itself shows the type of kids we have,” Murphy said. “It’s important to them whether it’s Game 22 or Game 1. Those kids want to win.

“I saw them shouting at me and everyone else. They wanted to get themselves pumped up and ready to roll.”

Note

The Nordonia junior varsity outlasted Highland 52-44. Collin Rittman scored 14 points for the Hornets.

Contact Bournival at sports@medina-gazette.com.

Highland 57, Nordonia 50

HIGHLAND         14  10  13  20  —  57

NORDONIA         12  11  16  11  —  50

Highland — Kevin Greenhoe 4-0-8, Brogan Scott 9-5-25, Joe Wiencek 1-0-2, Ben Hauser 1-0-3, Tanner Houska 2-6-10, Zack Levine 1-0-2, Billy Kirchner 2-0-4, Tyler Frederick 0-0-0, Coltin Kinsey 0-00-, Isaac Matejin 1-0-3. TOTALS: 21-11-57.

Nordonia — Alex Alders 7-0-18, Justice Alexander 3-1-7, Diallo Niamke 6-0-12, Max Hartman 2-0-5, David Murray 1-0-2, Jordan Adams 1-0-3, Tye Evans 0-0-0, Ryan Smith 0-0-0, Luke Alders 1-1-3, Mike Piotrowski 0-0-0. TOTALS: 21-2-50.

3-point goals — Scott 2, Hauser, Matejin, Alders 4, Hartman, Adams. Rebounds — Highland 31, (Greenhoe 10), Nordonia 29 (Niamke 9). Assists — Highland 12 (Houska 6), Nordonia 10 (Hartman 4). Records — Highland (16-6, 9-5), Nordonia (7-14, 5-9). Junior varsity — Nordonia 52, Highland 44.

 


The post Houska nets 1,000th point in win appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.

]]>
http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/houska-nets-1000th-point-win/feed/ 0
Deck stacked against Colts http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/deck-stacked-colts/ http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/deck-stacked-colts/#respond Sat, 28 Feb 2015 08:00:37 +0000 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/?p=160093 GREEN — The Cloverleaf boys basketball team had a lot of things to contend with in the regular-season finale. Having already clinched its first Suburban League title since 1991, Green was playing for an undefeated season on senior night. The deck was stacked against the Colts from the outset. Cloverleaf felt the full brunt of Read More...

The post Deck stacked against Colts appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.


]]>
GREEN — The Cloverleaf boys basketball team had a lot of things to contend with in the regular-season finale.

Having already clinched its first Suburban League title since 1991, Green was playing for an undefeated season on senior night. The deck was stacked against the Colts from the outset.

Cloverleaf felt the full brunt of that in a 75-46 loss as the Bulldogs (22-0, 14-0) capped what is believed to be their first perfect regular season.

“The first goal we had was to win the league title,” Green coach Mark Kinsley said. “The kids kept that in mind and focused. We did a good job just worrying about the next game and not focusing on two weeks from now. I know it’s a clich←, but they did do that. They did a real good job of staying focused all year.”

The Bulldogs were led by the usual suspect, senior Austin Marciniak. Green’s all-time leading scorer was at the forefront of the Bulldogs’ offensive explosion with 22 points, including 13 in the first quarter on 5-for-7 shooting, three of the makes 3-pointers.

“We focused on coming out strong in the first four minutes of the first quarter and the first four minutes of the third quarter,” the 6-foot-3 guard said. “Those are the biggest parts of the game and they set the tone for each half.”

If not for Marciniak’s hot start, the Colts (4-18, 0-14), who got a career-high 16 points from Tim Schuerger, might have been sitting in a better position than down 31-16 at the half.

Things started getting out of hand in the second half, as the depth and balance of the Bulldogs widened the margin.

“They are a really good team,” said Cloverleaf center Dillon Mullins, who had eight points and 10 boards. “They are undefeated for a reason. They play really good defense and Marciniak is a really good shooter.”

Green seemed to have players coming out from under the bleachers, as 11 of the 12 that took the floor scored at least two points.

The SL champs hit 48 percent (30-for-63) from the floor to go along with a 37-26 rebounding advantage. They also committed just six turnovers and got 17 points and 11 rebounds from John Davies.

“It crazy,” Mullins said. “The first time we played them (a 90-49 Green win) they had seven or eight kids that hit 3-pointers. We were going to run zone, but we couldn’t because everyone can hit threes.”

Note

Cloverleaf dropped the junior varsity contest 62-45. Travis Hissom led the Colts with 13 points.

Contact Chad Grant at sports@medina-gazette.com.

Green 74, Cloverleaf 46

CLOVERLEAF            9    7   10  20  —  46

GREEN                     19  13  21  23  —  75

Cloverleaf — Connor Ploucha 4-0-9, Andrew Jarrett 2-0-4, Dillon Mullins 3-2-8, Michael Martin 1-0-2, Braedon Hansen 2-0-6, Tim Schuerger 6-0-16, Connor Rhine 0-1-1, Jeff Gilbert 0-0-0, Tyler Kapeluck 0-0-0. TOTALS: 18-3-46.

Green — Austin Marciniak 8-2-22, Kenton Keesler 1-0-2, John Davies 8-1-17, Dan Stopp 2-0-5, Matthew Reppa 1-2-4, Dylan Kimberly 1-0-2, Noah Glass 3-0-6, Bobby Staudt 1-1-4, Kevin Nowacki 1-0-2, Noah Pritchard 2-1-5, Zach Schultz 2-0-6, Mark Corrato 0-0-0. TOTALS: 30-7-75.

3-point goals — Schuerger 4, Hansen 2, Ploucha, Marciniak 4, Schultz 2, Stopp, Stoudt. Rebounds — Cloverleaf 26 (Mullins 10), Green 37 (Davies 11). Assists — Cloverleaf 4 (Ploucha 2), Green 11 (Nowacki 4). Records — Green (22-0, 14-0), Cloverleaf (4-18, 0-14). Junior varsity — Green 62, Cloverleaf 45.

 


The post Deck stacked against Colts appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.

]]>
http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/deck-stacked-colts/feed/ 0
After state changes formule, missed school no longer means calamity http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/state-changes-formule-missed-school-no-longer-means-calamity/ http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/state-changes-formule-missed-school-no-longer-means-calamity/#respond Sat, 28 Feb 2015 06:31:23 +0000 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/?p=160101 So far this year, students in the Black River school district have missed 10 days of classes because of the bitter winter. On five more days, classes were delayed two hours. But the students may not have to make up any lost instructional time. In fact, Black River could cancel classes for another 10 days Read More...

The post After state changes formule, missed school no longer means calamity appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.


]]>
So far this year, students in the Black River school district have missed 10 days of classes because of the bitter winter. On five more days, classes were delayed two hours.

But the students may not have to make up any lost instructional time. In fact, Black River could cancel classes for another 10 days and still not be required to make up any time.

That’s because the Ohio Legislature fundamentally changed the way schools calculate “calamity days” by switching from days to hours.

Under the old system, each district could cancel up to five days’ worth of classes out of the total 182-day school year without having to make any days up. But any more time lost would mean adding days to the school calendar — either on Saturdays, during spring break or summer vacation.

But thanks to a change in state law approved in March 2014, three more days could be made up by sending students home with “blizzard bags” containing additional school work.

Under the new system, schools must make up days only if they drop below the state minimum number of educational hours: 1,001 hours for grades seven to 12 and 910 hours for kindergarten to sixth grade.

State school officials say the new system doesn’t alter Ohio’s educational standards because the minimum hours are determined by simply multiplying the 182 school days by the state’s required number of “educational hours” in a day — 5.5 hours for grades seven to 12 and five hours for lower grades.

But as a practical matter, the new system eliminates the statewide requirement to make up any lost time because most districts — including all seven serving Medina County — provide many more hours of instruction than the state minimum.

John Charlton, spokesman for the Ohio Department of Education, said the average Ohio school district had 1,126 hours of instruction, according to a survey done last year. An average district would have to cancel 23 days’ worth of classes to drop below the state’s minimum number of hours.

Schools providing more hours would have to cancel even more days of classes before requiring that the lost time be made up.

Nothing stops local school boards from choosing to make up for lost days, but it isn’t a requirement.

Some districts in Medina County are sticking with the old standard of only five “calamity days,” but others are undecided.

Black River

Black River started the year with a policy to make up any time lost after five days. But the board is rethinking that decision

“But now, because the board has realized that they have more flexibility, we have more options,” Superintendent Chris Clark said. “Now we’re trying to determine, if we use that flexibility, how far do we want to go?”

Clark said Black River provides 6.5 education hours each day, which works out to 1,150 hours a year after subtracting for parent-teacher days and other non-instructional time.

Clark said that using those numbers, his district has lost 75 hours of instruction because of the 10 days of canceled classes and five days of late starts.

But under the new system, Black River would have to cancel 74 more hours to get down to the 1,001 minimum and be required to make up lost time.

Clark said the district administrators and board members are discussing with the teachers’ union whether to make up the hours of instructional time they lost.

“We’re starting to have some dialogue with our unions to see how they want to handle it,” he said. “We really can be creative here, and we need to discuss what do we need to do and what’s in the best interest of the district.”

Clark said that whether the district was on days or hours this year, he stands by his decision to close school on the days that they did.

“No superintendent likes to cancel school,” Black River Superintendent Chris Clark said. “The big problem here is, because it is so rural, when we get snow, we really get hit.

“The days or hours is not part of that decision. It’s about what’s best for the district and school safety is very important.”

House Bill 59

State Sen. Larry Obhof, R-Montville Township, voted for House Bill 59, the law passed in July 2014 that established the new calamity-day system.

“Absolutely, I voted for it to give the schools more flexibility to make up hours at the end of a day,” he said.

Obhof said that under the hours system districts can tack on hours to the end of school days to make up time, rather than have to schedule make up days into June.

In response to last year’s hard winter, the Legislature added four calamity days for the 2013-14 school year, but the districts had to make up any more than nine days.

He said that even though the new law effectively eliminates calamity days, he expects districts to go far beyond the state’s minimum with instructional hours.

“I don’t think you’ll have a pattern of districts saying, ‘Hey, let’s take off 20 days because we can,’ ” Obhof said. “I think if that did emerge, the state would respond to that, but we haven’t seen anything like that so far this year.”

“I don’t think, even in years like last year or this year, that not having to make up days will be a significant problem, because most districts schedule much more than the requirement,” he said.

State Rep. Dave Hall, R-Millersburg, who represents the western portion of Medina County, agreed that if the state started seeing a pattern of districts making up fewer and fewer days, he would hope the Legislature would “revisit” the law.

“I don’t think we lowered the standard,” Hall said. “We can’t predict the weather, and superintendents can’t either, and it’s difficult for them to make that call. So we wanted to give them more flexibility.”

Hall said he doesn’t believe that any districts are “short-changing” students when it comes to not making up snow days.

“Yes, you’re getting less time, but each school year is going to be different depending on the weather,” he said. “I haven’t gotten any calls from parents thinking their kids are being short-changed, and you want to make sure these kids are safe in the bad weather.”

Buckeye

So far, the only district in the county on the new system with a firm policy to make up some lost days is Buckeye.

Buckeye Schools have 20 more school days scheduled than required, so they have no worries they’ll fall short of state standards.

The school’s calendar, approved by the school board, requires the students to make up anything more than five missed days.

If one or two more snow days bring the total up to six or seven total, the district will extend a few hours at the end of the school day to make up for the lost time.

If the district has eight or nine snow days, students will get home make-up work to do for those two missed days.

If the district has to use a 10th snow day, it will have to tack on days to the end of the year.

When asked why the district would make up days not required by the state, Superintendent Brian Williams said it was about providing a good education.

“We think our kids need to be in class,” Williams said. “We don’t think it’s good for them to miss too much class.”

Williams also said he hopes there won’t be a need to make up any more days.

Wadsworth

Wadsworth Superintendent Andrew Hill said that if they have to cancel three more days, their district will also start making them up.

“We don’t have any hard-fast policy, but if we get to 10 days, then we’ll have a conversation with our board to make days up,” he said. “We still have plenty of hours left that we could miss, but just because we have those hours available, doesn’t mean making up that instruction isn’t important.”

Wadsworth also has 6.5-hour school days, with 1,155 hours in their calendar. The district has lost 47.5 hours in weather-related closings and delays, but still has more than 100 hours they could lose before they would have to make them up.

“We have a contingency plan to make up days at the end of the school year, so if we were to add days, it would be at the end of the year,” Hill said.

Brunswick

Brunswick Superintendent Michael Mayell also said he plans to make up any time lost over five days.

So far, Brunswick has canceled classes six days.

“We’ll be making them up after five, but we haven’t scheduled the make up days yet, and we’re not sure how they’re going to look,” he said.

Highland

Highland Schools is 100 hours ahead of the state requirement because they schedule 1,161 hours for their high school calendar, according to the district’s communications director, Dawn Marzano.

Cloverleaf

Cloverleaf schedules 1,144 hours and still has 93 hours before the district would need to make any up.

“We’re far over the minimum of hours scheduled for the year,” Cloverleaf Superintendent Daryl Kubilis said. “We’re just using the state’s method for now.”

Medina

The only district in the county not yet on the state’s hours system is Medina.

The law permits that any district with a collective bargaining agreement prior to July 1, 2014, does not have to change to hours until the contract is completed, Charlton said.

Medina’s teacher agreement falls under that category, said Amy Busby, Medina’s communications director.

“We have to complete this contract before we can move to the hours system, which won’t be until the 2017-18 school year,” she said.

Contact reporter Katie Anderson at (330) 721-4012 or kanderson@medina-gazette.com.
Reporter Loren Genson contributed to this report.

Black River has canceled the most classes, but all seven districts serving Medina County have been closed at least five days this year due to the weather.A breakout for the districts’ closed days and two-hour delays so far this year are as follows:

  • Black River—10 days off, five two-hour delays
  • Brunswick—six days off
  • Buckeye—five days off, two two-hour delays
  • Cloverleaf—seven days off, two two-hour delays
  • Highland—six days off, four two-hour delays
  • Medina—six days off
  • Wadsworth—seven days off, one two-hour delay

The post After state changes formule, missed school no longer means calamity appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.

]]>
http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/28/state-changes-formule-missed-school-no-longer-means-calamity/feed/ 0
Leonard Nimoy, famous as Mr. Spock on ‘Star Trek,’ dies at 83 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/27/leonard-nimoy-famous-mr-spock-star-trek-dies-83/ http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/27/leonard-nimoy-famous-mr-spock-star-trek-dies-83/#respond Fri, 27 Feb 2015 19:47:17 +0000 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/?p=160078 LOS ANGELES — Leonard Nimoy, the actor known and loved by generations of “Star Trek” fans as the pointy-eared, purely logical science officer Mr. Spock, has died. Nimoy died Friday of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his Los Angeles home, with family at his side, said his son, Adam Nimoy. He was 83. Although Read More...

The post Leonard Nimoy, famous as Mr. Spock on ‘Star Trek,’ dies at 83 appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.


]]>
In this 2009 file photo, actor Leonard Nimoy, famous for playing officer Mr. Spock in “Star Trek,” poses for a portrait. Nimoy died Friday in Los Angeles of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 83. (AP PHOTO)

In this 2009 file photo, actor Leonard Nimoy, famous for playing officer Mr. Spock in “Star Trek,” poses for a portrait. Nimoy died Friday in Los Angeles of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 83. (AP PHOTO)

LOS ANGELES — Leonard Nimoy, the actor known and loved by generations of “Star Trek” fans as the pointy-eared, purely logical science officer Mr. Spock, has died.

Nimoy died Friday of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his Los Angeles home, with family at his side, said his son, Adam Nimoy. He was 83.

Although Nimoy followed his 1966-69 “Star Trek” run with a notable career as both an actor and director, in the public’s mind he would always be Spock. His half-human, half-Vulcan character was the calm counterpoint to William Shatner’s often-emotional Captain Kirk on one of TV and film’s most revered cult series.

“He affected the lives of many,” Adam Nimoy said. “He was also a great guy and my best friend.”

Asked if his father chafed at his fans’ close identification of him with his character, Adam Nimoy said, “Not in the least. He loved Spock.”

His death drew immediate reaction on Earth and in space.

“I loved him like a brother. We will all miss his humor, his talent and his capacity to love,” Shatner said.

“Live Long and Prosper, Mr. #Spock!” tweeted Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, aboard the International Space Station.

Nimoy displayed ambivalence to the famous role in the titles of his two autobiographies: “I Am Not Spock” (1975) and “I Am Spock” (1995).

After “Star Trek” ended, the actor immediately joined the hit adventure series “Mission Impossible” as Paris, the mission team’s master of disguises.

From 1976 to 1982, he hosted the syndicated TV series “In Search of … ,” which attempted to probe such mysteries as the legend of the Loch Ness Monster and the disappearance of aviator Amelia Earhart.

He played Israeli leader Golda Meir’s husband opposite Ingrid Bergman in the TV drama “A Woman Called Golda” and Vincent van Gogh in “Vincent,” a one-man stage show on the life of the troubled painter. He continued to work well into his 70s, playing gazillionaire genius William Bell in the Fox series “Fringe.”

He also directed several films, including the hit comedy “Three Men and a Baby” and appeared in such plays as “A Streetcar Named Desire,” ‘’Cat on a Hot Tim Roof,“ ‘’Fiddler on the Roof,” ‘’The King and I,“ ‘’My Fair Lady” and “Equus.” He also published books of poems, children’s stories and his own photographs.

But he could never really escape the role that took him overnight from bit-part actor status to TV star, and in a 1995 interview he sought to analyze the popularity of Spock, the green-blooded space traveler who aspired to live a life based on pure logic.

People identified with Spock because they “recognize in themselves this wish that they could be logical and avoid the pain of anger and confrontation,” Nimoy concluded.

“How many times have we come away from an argument wishing we had said and done something different?” he asked.

In the years immediately after “Star Trek” left television, Nimoy tried to shun the role, but he eventually came to embrace it, lampooning himself on such TV shows as “Futurama,” ‘’Duckman“ and ”The Simpsons” and in commercials.

He became Spock after “Star Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry was impressed by his work in guest appearances on the TV shows “The Lieutenant” and “Dr. Kildare.”

The space adventure set in the 23rd century had an unimpressive debut on NBC on Sept. 8, 1966, and it struggled during its three seasons to find an audience other than teenage boys. It seemed headed for oblivion after it was canceled in 1969, but its dedicated legion of fans, who called themselves Trekkies, kept its memory alive with conventions and fan clubs and constant demands that the cast be reassembled for a movie or another TV show.

Trekkies were particularly fond of Spock, often greeting one another with the Vulcan salute and the Vulcan motto, “Live Long and Prosper,” both of which Nimoy was credited with bringing to the character. He pointed out, however, that the hand gesture was actually derived from one used by rabbis during Hebraic benedictions.

When the cast finally was reassembled for “Star Trek — The Motion Picture,” in 1979, the film was a huge hit and five sequels followed. Nimoy appeared in all of them and directed two. He also guest starred as an older version of himself in some of the episodes of the show’s spinoff TV series, “Star Trek: The Next Generation.”

“Of course the role changed my career— or rather, gave me one,” he once said. “It made me wealthy by most standards and opened up vast opportunities. It also affected me personally, socially, psychologically, emotionally. … What started out as a welcome job to a hungry actor has become a constant and ongoing influence in my thinking and lifestyle.”

In 2009, he was back in a new big-screen version of “Star Trek,” this time playing an older Spock who meets his younger self, played by Zachary Quinto. Critic Roger Ebert called the older Spock “the most human character in the film.”

Among those seeing the film was President Barack Obama, whose even manner was often likened to Spock’s.

“Everybody was saying I was Spock, so I figured I should check it out,” Obama said at the time.

Upon the movie’s debut, Nimoy told The Associated Press that in his late 70s he was probably closer than ever to being as comfortable with himself as the logical Spock always appeared to be.

“I know where I’m going, and I know where I’ve been,” he said. He reprised the role in the 2013 sequel “Star Trek Into Darkness.”

Born in Boston to Jewish immigrants from Russia, Nimoy was raised in an Italian section of the city where, although he counted many Italian-Americans as his friends, he said he also felt the sting of anti-Semitism growing up.

At age 17 he was cast in a local production of Clifford Odets’ “Awake and Sing” as the son in a Jewish family.

“This role, the young man surrounded by a hostile and repressive environment, so touched a responsive chord that I decided to make a career of acting,” he said later.

He won a drama scholarship to Boston College but eventually dropped out, moved to California and took acting lessons at the Pasadena Playhouse.

Soon he had lost his “Boston dead-end” accent, hired an agent and began getting small roles in TV series and movies. He played a baseball player in “Rhubarb” and an Indian in “Old Overland Trail.”

After service in the Army, he returned to Hollywood, working as taxi driver, vacuum cleaner salesman, movie theater usher and other jobs while looking for acting roles.

In 1954 he married Sandra Zober, a fellow student at the Pasadena Playhouse, and they had two children, Julie and Adam. The couple divorced, and in 1988 he married Susan Bay, a film production executive.

Besides his wife, son and daughter, Nimoy is survived by his stepson, Aaron Bay Schuck. Services will be private, Adam Nimoy said.


The post Leonard Nimoy, famous as Mr. Spock on ‘Star Trek,’ dies at 83 appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.

]]>
http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/27/leonard-nimoy-famous-mr-spock-star-trek-dies-83/feed/ 0
Travis Kvapil’s NASCAR car stolen from hotel before race http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/27/travis-kvapils-nascar-car-stolen-hotel-race/ http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/27/travis-kvapils-nascar-car-stolen-hotel-race/#respond Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:48:59 +0000 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/?p=160075 ATLANTA — Travis Kvapil’s NASCAR Sprint Cup car was stolen early Friday, forcing him to withdraw from a race this weekend near Atlanta. A trailer with the red No. 44 car inside was hitched to a black 2004 Ford F-350 pickup truck parked outside a hotel in Morrow, Georgia, about 15 miles south of Atlanta, Read More...

The post Travis Kvapil’s NASCAR car stolen from hotel before race appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.


]]>
In this April 6, 2014, file photo, Travis Kvapil walks the track before a rain delayed start for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas. (AP PHOTO)

In this April 6, 2014, file photo, Travis Kvapil walks the track before a rain delayed start for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas. (AP PHOTO)

ATLANTA — Travis Kvapil’s NASCAR Sprint Cup car was stolen early Friday, forcing him to withdraw from a race this weekend near Atlanta.

A trailer with the red No. 44 car inside was hitched to a black 2004 Ford F-350 pickup truck parked outside a hotel in Morrow, Georgia, about 15 miles south of Atlanta, police said. Surveillance video shows the truck and trailer being driven out of the parking lot around 5:30 a.m., Morrow police Detective Sgt. Larry Oglesby said.

The trailer is plain white with no markings. The person who stole it likely didn’t realize the racecar was inside, and may have thought it was lawn equipment or something else he could easily sell, Oglesby said.

“Hopefully they’ll open this one up and say, ‘Oh no, this isn’t what we thought,’ and will drop it off at the nearest vacant lot or apartment complex or somewhere,” Oglesby said.

The 2015 Chevy NASCAR racecar inside the trailer is valued at $250,000, according to a police report. Also inside the trailer was a spare engine valued at $100,000 and racing equipment valued at $17,500.

A spokesman said the No. 44 team has withdrawn from this weekend’s race at Atlanta Motor Speedway.


The post Travis Kvapil’s NASCAR car stolen from hotel before race appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.

]]>
http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/27/travis-kvapils-nascar-car-stolen-hotel-race/feed/ 0
Woman, son rescued from burning home in Lodi http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/27/woman-son-rescued-burning-home-lodi/ http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/27/woman-son-rescued-burning-home-lodi/#respond Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:54:12 +0000 http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/?p=160071 LODI — Police pulled an elderly woman out of a burning residence on Bank Street at about 1:15 p.m. Saturday. When police arrived at the residence, they saw “billowing black smoke” coming from the house according to the police report. They found an elderly woman and got her out. Lodi firefighters found the woman’s son Read More...

The post Woman, son rescued from burning home in Lodi appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.


]]>
LODI — Police pulled an elderly woman out of a burning residence on Bank Street at about 1:15 p.m. Saturday.

When police arrived at the residence, they saw “billowing black smoke” coming from the house according to the police report. They found an elderly woman and got her out.

Lodi firefighters found the woman’s son and got him out as well.

Both mother and son were transported to Lodi Community Hospital for treatment for smoke inhalation. The cause of the fire is being investigated.


The post Woman, son rescued from burning home in Lodi appeared first on The Medina County Gazette.

]]>
http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.com/2015/02/27/woman-son-rescued-burning-home-lodi/feed/ 0